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The Mobile Video Experience: A mobile viewer’s journey from discovery to advocacy

This report looks into the factors driving mobile video growth and maps the consumer journey from mobile discovery to advocacy uncovering consumer attitudes towards paid video and the kind of mobile ads they prefer to see.

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Table of Contents

  1. Mobile Video Growth Drivers
    1. Mobile vs Desktop Video: How does mobile compare against desktop in video usage?
    2. Sizing the Future of Mobile Video: How big will the mobile video market be in 2019?
    3. Mobile Video Growth Drivers: What is driving mobile video growth?
  2. The Mobile Video Consumer Journey
    1. Mobile Video Discovery: How and where do people find mobile videos?
    2. Mobile Video Influence: What influences people’s decision to watch a mobile video?
    3. Mobile Video Consumption: How, when, and where do people watch mobile videos?
    4. Mobile Video Monetization: Are people willing to pay for mobile video?
    5. Mobile Video Ads: What kind of ads do mobile video viewers want?
    6. Mobile Video Advocacy: How do mobile viewers engage after watching a video?

LIST OF CHARTS

  1. Mobile drives growth of online video usage
  2. People spend more time with mobile video
  3. Mobile video to surpass desktop video in 2016
  4. 50% smartphone video penetration in 2019
  5. Tablet video viewers cross 100 million mark
  6. Mobile video faces opportunities & barriers
  7. US leads in mobile video growth drivers
  8. Heavy video users drive daily consumption
  9. US over index for daily short video viewers
  10. People prefer smartphones for short videos>
  11. 4G drives mobile video consumption
  12. Mobile video traffic beats social media
  13. Mobile influences decision to cancel pay-TV
  14. Mobile video content perceived as desirable
  15. Millennials drive live streaming video app usage
  16. Ease of use and novelty drives use of Periscope
  17. Word of mouth drives mobile video discovery
  18. Video content providers are top discovery platform
  19. Video content providers lead across all markets
  20. Leisure & relaxation influence decision to watch
  21. Short form music & funny viral videos attract viewers
  1. US and Canada lead in short form video viewers
  2. People prefer watching funny virals the most
  3. Funny virals drive short form mobile video in US
  4. US leads in mobile viewing of full TV episodes
  5. People mostly view mobile videos on apps
  6. Mobile video viewing peaks at prime time
  7. People mostly watch mobile videos at home
  8. Long form video viewers most likely to pay
  9. US, Canada & East Asia drive paid mobile video
  10. Most people would watch ads to avoid paying
  11. Video ads more noticeable than other ad types
  12. Video ads win people’s attention in the US
  13. People recognize online video ads if seen on TV
  14. Mobile video viewers want relevant ads
  15. People wants ads relevant to videos they watch
  16. People engage on social media post viewing
  17. Most people share mobile videos they view
  18. Heavy advocates share mobile video every day
  19. Free, fast, and good quality videos drive advocacy
  20. US video advocates most driven by price and quality

VIEW ALL CHARTS IN THE REPORT

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SECTION 1

Mobile Video Growth Drivers

In this section we look at the rise of mobile video consumption.
We will also identify factors driving this growth.

SECTION 1.1

Mobile vs Desktop Video

How does mobile compare against desktop in video usage?

Data Highlights

  • Growth in laptop/desktop video viewing expected to remain 72% in 2015 – same as 2014.
  • Smartphone and tablet usage for video has more than doubled since 2013 reaching 56% and 48%.
  • People spend 39 minutes a day on mobile video – smartphones (17 min) and tablets (22 min).
  • Tablet is fastest growing device for video (119.8% growth) followed by smartphones (81.1%).
  • Mobile share of online video will reach 39% by end of 2015 – up from 26% in 2014.
  • Mobile share of online video (50.2%) will surpass desktop share (49.8%) in 2016.

Findings

  • Mobile drives online video usage growth
  • People spend more time on mobile video
  • Mobile video set to surpass desktop video in 2016

Mobile drives online video usage growth

Online video viewers aren’t replacing desktops and laptops with smartphones and tablets. They are instead watching videos on all four screens. Consumers can use different devices to watch videos at home or on-the-move. They are adding Internet connected television and iPod touch for a seamless experience.

Mobile devices – smartphones and tablets – have been catching up fast among online video viewers. In 2015, more than half (56%) of all Internet users watched videos on smartphones. This is an increase from just over a quarter (26%) of consumers in 2013. Almost half (48%) of them also watched videos on tablets – up from under a quarter (23%) in 2013.

Internet connected television allows people to watch online videos on their television screens. They can access sites like YouTube as well as services like Netflix and Hulu. More than half (56%) of online video viewers will use this technology in 2015. This is an increase from just over a quarter (27%) in 2013. People can start discover a video on their smartphone and bookmark it. They can watch it later with friends and family on an Internet connected television.

iPod Touch has been growing as a video-viewing device. A quarter (25%) of video viewers will use the device to watch videos in 2015. This is an increase from just over one in ten (13%) viewers in 2013. The iPod Touch is a cheaper alternative for young people. It is also an entry-level media device for the young consumer. iPod’s growth points towards consumption of music on video form as well.

People spend more time on mobile video

Consumers are already spending more time watching videos on mobile devices. Consumers spend on average 39 minutes a day watching videos on mobile devices. In comparison, they spend 24 minutes a day watching videos on desktops and laptops. Tablets make up for more than half (22 minutes) of time spent on mobile video.

Tablets have a bigger screen compared to smartphones and greater mobility compared to desktops. As a result time spent on tablets is growing at a faster rate than any other device. Time spent watching videos on tablet more than doubled (120% growth) over the last four years. Time spent watching videos on smartphones grew by 81%. Desktops and latpops recorded the slowest growth rate at 19% since 2011.

Mobile video set to surpass desktop video in 2016

As people spend more time watching videos on mobile, it is set to surpass desktop video in 2016. Mobile will make up just over half (50.2%) of all online video views by end of 2016.

Smartphone’s video growth comes from the proliferation of short funny virals and music videos. Consumers tend to watch such videos in part or full when they come across it on social media. Longer TV episode and movies drive tablet’s growth. Tablet users can watch long form video while in their beds with headphones. This convenience was earlier afforded by laptops. Tablets are more convenient because consumers don’t have to wait for it to boot up. They can also switch between various apps making it easy to browse a wider range of videos.

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SECTION 1.2

Sizing the Future of Mobile Video

How big will the mobile video market be in 2019?

Data Highlights

  • Smartphone video will reach half (50%) of all smartphone owners by end of 2019.
  • Smartphone video viewers will cross 100 million in 2015 and grow to 137 million in 2019.
  • Tablet video will reach almost seven in ten (67%) of all tablet owners by end of 2019.
  • The number of tablet video viewers will cross 100 million in 2015 and grow to 120 million in 2019.

Findings

  • Video to reach half of all smartphone owners in 2019
  • Tablet video viewers cross 100 million mark

Video will reach half of all smartphone owners in 2019

More than two in five (42%) smartphone owners will watch videos on the handheld device in 2015. Smartphone video penetration will grow over the next four years. By the end of 2019 half of all smartphone owners will be regular mobile video consumers.

The number of smartphone video viewers will cross the 100 million mark in 2015. There will be 107 million smartphone viewers by the end of 2015 – up from 94 million in 2014. Smartphone video viewers will grow in numbers reaching 137 million in 2019.

Tablet video viewers cross 100 million mark

Tablet video viewers will also cross the 100 million mark in 2015. There will be 101 million tablet viewers by the end of 2015 – up from 89 million in 2014. The number of tablet video viewers will grow to reach 120 million in 2019.

Despite a smaller consumer base, tablet viewers are ahead of smartphone viewers. Tablet video penetration crossed the half way mark in 2013. More than three in five (63%) tablet users will view online videos in 2015. Tablet video penetration will increase to almost seven in ten (67%) users by 2019.

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SECTION 1.3

Mobile Video Growth Drivers

What is driving mobile video growth?

Data Highlights

  • Top growth drivers are higher frequency (35%), short videos (31%), and cord cutting (22%).
  • Limited data plans (22%) and wi-fi dependency (40%) are key mobile video growth barriers.
  • Highest growth in usage frequency comes from the US & Canada market (46%).
  • US & Canada market also face greater growth obstacle with limited data plan (28%).
  • Heavy users, those who watch mobile video at least once a day, make up 58% of short form & 36% of long form viewers.
  • US & Canada have more heavy mobile video viewers (60%) compared to global average (58%).
  • Latin America leads in heavy users for both short (61%) and long (41%) form video.
  • Short videos – viral clips (51%) and music videos (47%) – best suited for smartphones.
  • People use tablets to watch long form videos like TV shows (47%) and movies (42%).
  • 4G boosts usage of streaming video (33%), sharing video (15%), and video calling (14%)
  • 4G increased use of email (48%), streaming music (45%), and social networking (44%).
  • Downloads, uploads and streaming video drives more than a quarter (28%) of UK 4G traffic.
  • Traffic from social media (28%), music and apps (7%) lag behind mobile video.
  • Online video influenced more than three quarters (76%) of TV subscription cancellations.
  • Mobile video, in particular, influenced over half (53%) of cord cutting.
  • Mobile video content perceived as innovative and unique for young consumers.
  • Regular television content perceived as traditional and generic for older consumers.
  • More than one in five (21%) smartphone owners have used or plan to use live streaming apps.
  • Half of all live streaming apps users are 18-34 year olds Millennials.
  • Consumers use live streaming apps because they are free (59%), easy to use (43%), and new (42%).
  • A small group of consumers also value its role in staying in touch with friends and family (32%).

Findings

  • The four factors driving mobile video growth are higher daily viewing frequency, mass availability of short form videos, growing 4G adoption, and preference for online video content over TV.
  • Heavy users drive daily consumption
  • People prefer smartphones for short form videos
  • 4G drives mobile video traffic ahead of social media
  • Mobile viewers prefer online video to TV content
  • Millennials drive growth of mobile video streaming apps

Four key growth drivers for mobile video

In the previous section we saw that more and more people are turning to mobile video. These people are also watching more videos everyday. More than a third (35%) of mobile video viewers watch more videos compared to previous years. The top factor driving mobile video growth is higher frequency of daily viewership.

Availability of short form videos is another key driver of mobile video growth. More than three in ten (31%) of viewers prefer watching short videos on mobile devices. Short form videos are less than 5 minutes in length such as a music video or a funny viral. Consumers tend to come across short videos on social media while on the move. Smartphones are ideal to consume videos in such scenarios.

Increased 4G connections is another factor driving mobile video growth. More than a quarter (27%) of viewers increased video usage after getting a 4G connection. 4G enables faster load times and reduces lag while watching playback. A better mobile experience is a strong motivator to consume more video.

Lack of 4G can prove to be a key barrier in mobile video usage. Four in ten (40%) viewers watch mobile video only on a wireless network. Wireless offers faster and more reliable connections. Consumers value the viewing experience enough to wait till they can connect to wi-fi at home or work. They also wish for data plans that were video friendly. More than one in five (22%) say they would watch more if plans were more flexible. Limited data plans and high data costs are key pain points that discourage mobile video usage.

The final factor driving mobile video growth is a preference for online video. More than one in five (22%) viewers watch less television because of mobile video. People perceive online video as exciting and relevant. The greater attraction towards online content is a result of its novelty.

In summary the four factors driving mobile video growth are
  1. Higher daily viewing frequency (35%)
  2. Mass availability of short form videos (31%)
  3. Growing 4G adoption (27%)
  4. Preference for online video content over TV (22%)

All four growth drivers are much more prominent in the North American markets of US and Canada. Almost half (46%) of North American viewers increased their daily viewing frequency. More than a third (35%) prefer mobile for short videos. Viewers in the US and Canada are also driven by 4G (29%) and online content (23%).

Mobile video pain points are also more prominent among consumers in North America. More than four in ten (41%) depend on wi-fi to watch videos. Limited and costly data plans prevent more than a quarter (28%) from watching videos.

Heavy users drive daily consumption

Heavy users are consumers who watch mobile video at least once a day. Viewers are more likely to be heavy users of shorter videos than longer videos. More than half (58%) of short form viewers are heavy users. In comparison, just over a third (36%) of long form viewers are heavy users.

The US (60%), Europe (60%), and Latin America (61%) have highest share of heavy users. Latin American viewers are heavy users of both short (61%) and long (41%) videos. East Asian viewers are the least likely to be heavy users of short videos (43%). Viewers in the Pacific region are least likely to be heavy users of long videos (29%).

People prefer smartphones for short form videos

Higher preference for smartphones has likely to do more with its greater accessibility. People can watch videos on their smartphones during the commute or during a short break. They can also watch videos on smartphones to kill time while waiting or avoid boredom.

People prefer tablets for long form videos likes TV shows (47%) and movies (42%). Full-length TV shows and movies on the larger tablet screen is a better experience.

Smartphones are the device of choice for short online videos despite its smaller screen. More than half (51%) of viewers prefer smartphones when watching user generated short clips. In comparison only two in five (40%) prefer a tablet to view such videos.

People also prefer smartphones to view music videos (47%) and TV show clips (37%). Less than two in five (40%) prefer to watch music videos on a tablet. Even less (35%) prefer watching TV show clips on a tablet.

4G drives mobile video traffic ahead of social media

Consumers on a 4G connection are likely to increase their video usage. A third (33%) of consumers using a 4G network increased video consumption. Another 15% have uploaded and shared video via their mobile device. Consumers also increased frequency of video calling (14%) since getting a 4G connection.

A faster and more reliable connection means 4G users are power mobile media consumers. They not only watch more video, but also stream more music (45%). More than two in five 4G users increase their social media (44%) and navigation (42%) usage.

There might be more mobile social media users than mobile video viewers. But 4G consumers account a greater traffic share compared to social media. More than a quarter (28%) of UK 4G traffic comes from mobile video. In comparison, just over one in five (23%) 4G traffic comes from social media.

Mobile video is already a more effective driver of mobile data growth. As a result, 4G consumers want plans that are either unlimited or more affordable.

Mobile viewers prefer online video to TV content

People’s preference for online video can driven them to cancel their Tv subscription altogether. Online video is an important reason behind why people cancel their TV subscription. Almost half (48%) of consumers who cancelled their subscription agree. More than a quarter (28%) agrees it was somewhat important. More than three-quarter (76%) of cord cutters cite online video as a key influence.

Mobile video, in particular, influenced more than half (53%) to cancel their TV subscriptions. Mobile video was definitely important for just over one in five (21%) cord cutters. Almost a third (32%) say mobile video played a somewhat important role in their decision.

Both online and mobile video also influences consumers who’ve never had a TV subscription. More than three in five (65%) of non-subscribers say online video influenced their decision. A similar proportion (63%) say mobile video played a role in their decision.

Mobile viewers perceive online video content as more desirable compared to television. They perceive mobile video as innovative and unique content. Traditional and generic are adjectives associated with TV content.

Mobile video is also perceived as the domain of young consumers. As a result TV gets associated with older demographic. In a significant finding, consumers believe TV viewing happens at home. In contrast, they perceive mobile video as location independent.

Millennials drive growth of mobile video streaming apps

In recent times, mobile video viewers have also become content creators. Live streaming apps like Periscope and Meerkat make this possible. Just over one in five (21%) mobile device owners have used or plan to use such live streaming apps. Live streaming app users skew male (24% vs 19% for female). Half of them are 18 to 34 year old millennials.

The apps are free to download and use. This attracts more than half (59%) of all live streaming app users. An intuitive user experience also drives adoption among millennials. Over two in five (43%) find the apps easy to use. The novelty of the experience (42%) is also a key driver.

With live streaming apps, consumers can watch events as seen by a viewer instead via TV channels. It is a raw human experience. A third (33%) of live streaming app users watch videos to see if something exciting happens. Things going awry or a funny candid piece of performance can make broadcasts come to life. Just under a third (32%) use live vide streaming to stay in touch with friends and family. This is a strong sign that video calling is moving to mobile. It also points to the relaxed nature of video calls compared to video conferencing.

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SECTION 2

The Mobile Video Consumer Journey

In the next four sections we map out a mobile video viewer’s journey from discovery to advocacy.

SECTION 2.1

Mobile Video Discovery

How and where do people find mobile videos?

Data Highlights

  • Word of mouth drives mobile video discovery for more than half (53%) of all viewers.
  • People find mobile video via social media (42%), links (29%), and mobile ads (24%).
  • Consumers visit video content providers (72%) to find videos.
  • YouTube (62%) is the top video content provider.
  • Social media (42%) and search (20%) also attract mobile viewers.

Findings

  • Word of mouth drives mobile video discovery
  • Video content providers are top discovery platform

Word of mouth drives mobile video discovery

One possible scenario of discovery is when people stumble across a video. They have no agenda of viewing a video. But they come across videos through word of mouth or while browsing online. We call this scenario Unintentional Browsing.

Word of mouth is the top discovery source during unintentional browsing. More than half (53%) of viewers discover mobile video through word of mouth. Word of mouth comes from people they trust – friends, family and relatives. Trusted recommendations drive people’s choices. Consumers watch videos without a paid media prompt when others they trust recommend it.

Social media is the next big discovery source during unintentional browsing. More than two in five (42%) of viewers discover mobile video when browsing social media sites. Availability of apps and improved mobile network drives passive browsing of social networks. Consumers turn to social media apps like Facebook and Twitter to kill time. They come across videos posted by friends and brands they follow. Trust in content shared by the online connections motivates them to watch videos.

Outside of social media, consumers are prone to click on links they stumble upon. The links could be on a website like Buzzfeed or in their email inbox. Almost three in ten (29%) viewers find mobile videos by clicking on links. The random tendency to click on links drives greater discovery compared to mobile ads. Less than a quarter (24%) of viewers discover videos through mobile ads.

Just over one in five (22%) viewers click on algorithm generated recommended videos. This is the same proportion of viewers who discover videos through search and news.

Video content providers are top discovery platform

A second scenario of discovery is when people go online to find and watch videos. They have a focused agenda. This scenario is Intentional Browsing. Viewers likely have a mental list of sites to visit.

The top discovery source during intentional browsing is video content providers. More than seven in ten (72%) viewers discover mobile video on such apps. The leading video content provider app is YouTube. More than three in five (62%) viewers go to YouTube to find videos to watch. Just over one in ten (13%) visit apps from TV networks to find and watch videos.

Just over two in five (42%) visit social media sites during intentional browsing. The figure is identical to unintentional browsers who discover videos on social media during. Social media does little to promote video discovery. Consumers are as likely to find videos via social media by chance as they are to find via a campaign. They are even less likely to search (20%) for a video.

A significant finding is that mobile ads play negligible role in video discovery. Their influence is lower for intentional browsers compared to unintentional ones. Just over one in ten (14%) viewers discover mobile video via ads. Consumers come across video ads on news apps (12%), their browser (11%) or info apps (10%).

Video content providers are the leading discovery source for viewers in all markets. North America (75%) has a slight lead ahead of Latin America (74%). East Asian viewers are least likely to discover video on social media but most likely to find it via search.

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SECTION 2.2

Mobile Video Influence

What influences people’s decision to watch a mobile video?

Data Highlights

  • People watch mobile videos to kill time when free (41%), to unwind (38%) or relax after work (31%).
  • People are also motivated to watch mobile videos if they have been waiting for the video (32%).
  • People watch music videos (49%) and short viral videos (49%) on smartphones.
  • People watch full TV show episodes (23%) and full-length movies (21%) on mobile.
  • North American viewers watch music video (57%), funny virals (60%), and movie trailers (55%).
  • Funny virals drive short form video in US & Canada (60%) & Australia & New Zealand (59%).
  • Consumers would choose watching funny virals (22%) to music (16%) or sports videos (11%).
  • Viewers prefer funny virals in US & Canada (25%) & Australia & New Zealand (30%).
  • Consumers in the US & Canada are most likely to watch full TV episodes on their mobile devices (30%).
  • East Asian consumers lead in watching full-length movies on their mobile devices (34%).

Findings

  • Leisure and relaxation influence decision to watch
  • Mobile viewers influenced by length of video

Leisure and relaxation influence decision to watch

A person’s state of mind is the primary driver in their decision to watch mobile video. Viewers turn to mobile video when they are free or want to loosen up.

More than two in five (41%) viewers watch mobile video when they have nothing to do. More than a third (38%) watch it when they are in the mood to unwind. Just over three in ten (31%) watch mobile video to relax after work or school assignment.

People rarely have a functional agenda behind watching mobile video. Less than a third (32%) look forward to online videos. They tend to be loyal followers of the online channel or celebrity. Less than a quarter (24%) look up videos relevant to their hobbies and interests.

A small niche turns to mobile video shunning television content. Just over one in five (22%) watch content that is not available on TV. Another one in five (20%) watch mobile video because they don’t have a TV subscription.

Mobile viewers influenced by length of video

Once in the right state of mind to watch a mobile video, viewers pay attention to length of the video. Mobile viewers favor short form music videos to longer ones.

Music videos, funny virals, and movie trailers are the top three most watched categories. All three types of videos tend to be five minutes or less on average. Just under half of all viewers prefer music video (49%) and funny short virals (49%). More than two in five (41%) opt for movie trailers. All three categories are ideal for people who want to kill some free time or relax after work.

Viewers in US and Canada are the most likely to turn to short form videos. Three in five (60%) watch funny viral shorts ahead of music videos (57%) and movie trailers (55%).

The trend is similar in the English speaking market of Australia and New Zealand. Almost three in five (59%) watch funny viral shorts. Music videos (51%) rank second and movie trailers (46%) rank third.

If given a choice, people prefer funny short virals to music videos. More than one in five (22%) prefer watching short virals. In comparison only 16% would pick music videos and just over one in ten (11%) opt for sports.

Funny viral shorts have a more human element that viewers relate to. They are also popular among peers and make for ideal conversation starters.

Preference for funny virals over music video is prominent in the US and Canada. A quarter (25%) of viewers prefer watching funny virals on mobile. In comparison, only 15% prefer watching music videos.

The differences are more prominent in Australia in New Zealand. Three in ten (30%) Aussies and Kiwis prefer watching funny viral videos. Just over one in ten (12%) lean towards watching music videos.

Long form videos are popular among a small viewer niche. Just over one in five viewers watch full TV show episodes (23%) and full-length movies (21%). The US leads in TV show mobile viewership.

Three in ten (30%) American viewers watch full TV episodes on their mobile. East Asia leads in mobile viewership of movies. More than a third (34%) of East Asian viewers watch full-length movies on their mobile.

In summary, most mobile viewers prefer short from videos especially funny virals. But, there is opportunity to engage long form viewers as well.

SECTION 2.3

Mobile Video Consumption

How, when, and where do people watch mobile videos?

Data Highlights

  • Consumers prefer apps (48%) to websites (18%) to watch mobile videos.
  • US lag behind other regions in adopting mobile apps for video consumption (44%).
  • Mobile video peaks at prime time i.e. 8 to 11 pm across all regions including US & Canada (48%).
  • US & Canada start peaking earlier (48% at 5PM-8PM) than other regions.
  • Home is top location to watch mobile videos globally (78%) and in the US & Canada (89%).
  • Viewers in the US & Canada watch mobile videos at other people’s home (37%) and work (33%).

Findings

  • Mobile viewers prefer apps to watch videos
  • Viewers turn to mobile at prime time
  • Mobile viewers watch videos in their homes

Mobile viewers prefer apps to watch videos

People prefer to apps over mobile websites because it saves them time. Apps are also faster and easier to use. You can find data on app preference in The Mobile App Experience report.

Almost half (48%) of viewers watch mobile video on apps. Less than one in five (18%) viewers watch mobile video on a browser. Just over one in five (22%) say they use both.

Mobile viewers across all regions prefer apps to website. Latin American viewers (52%) are the most likely to prefer apps. Viewers in Australia & New Zealand (49%) and East Asia (49%) come next. Viewers in the US and Canada are least likely to prefer apps (44%).

Viewers turn to mobile at prime time

Mobile video viewing peaks during prime time – 8pm to 11pm. This is true for all regions. Just over half (51%) of East Asian viewers watch mobile video during prime time. Almost half of viewers in Latin America (44%) and Europe (45%) also tune in at prime time.

The trend holds true for North America. Almost half (48%) of North American viewers watch mobile video during prime time. Viewers in the US and Canada tune in earlier than others. Mobile video viewership between 5pm and 8pm (48%) is at prime time levels. Viewers in Australia and New Zealand tune in earlier similar to North American viewers. Just over two in five (42%) viewers start watching between 5pm and 8pm. This increases to almost half (47%) of all viewers during prime time.

Mobile viewers watch videos in their homes

People prefer watching mobile videos at home. This is due to lack of 4G or fear of exceeding 4G data limit. Home offers wireless connection that is faster, reliable, and already paid for.

More than three quarters (78%) of viewers watch mobile video in their homes. Less than a quarter of viewers watch it at someone else’s home (24%) or at work (24%). Less than one in five (17%) watch the videos at school or college.

Viewers in the US and Canada are most likely to watch mobile video at home. Almost nine in ten (89%) have watched mobile video at home. Mobile viewership at home is above global average in East Asia (82%) and the Pacific region (81%).

SECTION 2.4

Mobile Video Monetization

Are people willing to pay for mobile video?

Data Highlights

  • Paying mobile video viewers make up a small niche (16%) and are more likely to be men (19%).
  • Long form viewers are most likely to pay for mobile video (23%).
  • East Asian viewers most likely to get paid mobile video (26%) followed by North Americans (23%).
  • People would watch free video with ads (78%) instead of paying to get rid of ads (23%).
  • Viewers in North America (26%), East Asia (26%), & Pacific region (26%) would pay to get rid of ads.

Findings

  • Long form video viewers are most likely to pay
  • Mobile viewers would watch ads to avoid paying

Long form video viewers are most likely to pay

Paying for mobile video is a niche behavior. Less than one in five (16%) viewers have paid for mobile video. Paying for mobile video tends to skew male. Male viewers are more likely to pay (19%) than women (13%). Heavy viewers of long form video are the most likely to pay. More than one in five (23%) of long form viewers paid to watch video on mobile.

Paid mobile video viewership beats the global average in North America and East Asia. More than a quarter (26%) of viewers in East Asia have paid to watch mobile video. Almost one in four (23%) viewers in the US and Canada have paid for a mobile video.

The payment could be a one-time fee to download a video file and watch it on mobile. Cloud based services allow viewers to download on one device but watch it across many. The payment could also be a subscription fee to gain access to a library. Monthly and annual subscriptions give viewers access to existing and new content.

Mobile viewers would watch ads to avoid paying

Almost four in five (78%) viewers are willing to watch an ad instead of paying for a video. Viewers in Latin America are the least willing to pay. More than four in five (82%) Latin American viewers won’t pay for an ad-free video experience. Just under three quarters (74%) of viewers in the US and Canada would settle for ads instead of paying.

Less than a quarter (23%) of viewers are willing to pay for an ad-free video experience. Viewers prefer to pay a monthly subscription fee to buying videos. Less than one in ten (8%) prefer buying individual files. In comparison, 15% of viewers would pay to subscribe on a monthly basis. Viewers in North America, East Asia, and Australia & New Zealand are most willing to pay. In all three markets, just over a quarter (26%) of viewers would pay for an ad-free video experience.

SECTION 2.5

Mobile Video Ads

What kind of ads do mobile video viewers want?

Data Highlights

  • Mobile video viewers notice video ads (44%) over sponsored messages (34%).
  • Fewer mobile video viewers notice pop-up ads (26%) and still images (24%).
  • More than half (57%) of North American viewers noticed a video ad.
  • Half of Pacific region viewers (50%) paid attention to video ads.
  • Around two third (66%) of viewers recognized TV ads on mobile often or sometimes.
  • Viewers in Latin America are most likely to recognize a mobile video ad (71%) from TV.
  • Seven in ten (70%) viewers in the US and Canada also recognize TV ads when they see it online.
  • Most consumers want mobile video ads tailored to their viewing experience (82%).
  • Consumers want ads relevant to the video (34% NA, 25% EU, 27% LAM, 35% AUS/NZ, 28% EA).
  • Viewers want ads tailored to viewing history in NA (28%), Europe (28%), and LAM (21%).
  • Viewers prefer ads from their favorite brands in Europe (17%) and East Asia (24%).

Findings

  • Mobile video ads leave an impression on viewers
  • Mobile viewers want ads relevant to video content

Mobile video ads leave an impression on viewers

Video ads are most effective in gaining customer attention compared to other mobile ads. More than two in five (44%) viewers noticed a video ad that plays before, during or after the video. In comparison, just over a third (34%) of viewers noticed a “sponsored by” message on the screen. Brands pay to have sponsored messages alongside popular videos on the screen. Most of them link to an ad specific to the brand.

Viewers are likely to close the ad or exit from the app to avoid it. Over a quarter (26%) of viewers noticed ads overlaid on the screen. Such ads interrupt the video experience. Even fewer (24%) noticed a still image before or after the video playback.

Viewers in the US and Canada are most likely to notice video ads. More than half (57%) of North American viewers noticed a video ad. Just under half of viewers (47%) noticed the “sponsored by” message on the screen.

Viewers in Australia and New Zealand also noticed video ads and “sponsored by” messages. Half of all viewers (50%) paid attention to video ads played before, during, or after the video. Another 45% paid attention to the “sponsored by” message on the screen.

Mobile viewers want ads relevant to video content

People recognize a mobile video ad if they have seen it on TV before. Almost two thirds (66%) of viewers recognized TV ads on mobile often or sometimes. Viewers in Latin America are most likely to recognize a mobile video ad (71%) from TV. Seven in ten (70%) viewers in the US and Canada also recognize TV ads when they see it online.

Sticking a TV ad before, during, or after a popular video is not the best strategy. More than four in five (82%) mobile video viewers want relevant ads. Ads become relevant when tailored to people’s viewing history, demographics or location.

Marketers can increase ad relevancy by associating them with the video. It is the number one request by viewers across all markets. More than a third (34%) of North Americans want ads relevant to the video. The figure is a little higher (35%) among viewers in Australia and New Zealand.

If it’s not the current video, viewers want ads based on their viewing history. More than a quarter (28%) of North Americans want ads tailored to their video history. Viewers in Latin America (21%), Pacific region (20%), and Europe (18%) want the same.

Viewers also demand that mobile video ads are relevant to their location. Just under a quarter (24%) of viewers in the US and Canada seek ads relevant to their location. Viewers in Europe (17%) and East Asia (24%) demand ads from their favorite brands.

SECTION 2.6

Mobile Video Advocacy

How do mobile viewers engage after watching a video?

Data Highlights

  • Women more likely to engage on social media (74%) after viewing a mobile video compared to men (62%).
  • Men most likely to add & read comments (27%).
  • Women most likely to follow show or creators on Facebook & Twitter (35%).
  • People share mobile videos after watching them (68%).
  • Mobile video viewers in North America (75%) are most likely to share followed by those in Latin America (73%).
  • A third (33%) of mobile video viewers share the videos at least once a week.
  • More than one in ten (15%) are heavy advocates sharing mobile video everyday.
  • Viewers share videos based on picture quality (40%), price (38%), and stream speed (33%).
  • Advocates consider sound quality (32%), wi-fi (30%), and trustworthiness of source (29%).
  • US viewers share video that’s free (51%), has good picture (51%) and sound quality (48%).
  • Streaming speed (42%), wi-fi connection (40%), and trust towards source (34%) drive sharing.

Findings

  • Viewers continue mobile video experience on social media
  • Mobile viewers are social media advocates
  • Free, fast and quality videos drive social media advocacy

Viewers continue mobile video experience on social media

Women are more likely to engage on social media after viewing a video on mobile. Almost three quarters (74%) of female viewers engage on social media. In comparison, just over three in five (62%) male viewers engage on social media.

Women are more likely than men to follow the show or creators on social media sites. More than a third (35%) of female viewers follow Facebook or Twitter accounts related to the show. The accounts could be official show channels or belong to people in the show. In comparison less than a quarter (235) of male viewers do the same.

Male viewers are more likely to read online discussion forums and add comments to the video. More than a quarter (27%) of men follow and contribute to online discussions. The discussions usually take place on the comments section below the video. They could also take place on a discussion forum that requires a separate login. In comparison, just over one in five (21%) women contribute to discussion.

Both men and women are just as likely to watch the videos again with friends. More than a quarter of men (27%) and women (28%) repeat watch videos in the presence of others. This is a more powerful way of ‘sharing’ video content because viewers interact face-to-face. In-person word of mouth leaves a more impressionable mark on people.

One in five men (20%) and less than one in four women (24%) post their opinions about video on social media. This goes beyond sharing the video link to posting a personal review. Viewers can also tag friends who they think would find the video relevant. It is a viable digital alternative when in-person sharing is not possible.

Mobile viewers are social media advocates

More than two-thirds (68%) of mobile video viewers share the video on social media sites. Viewers in the US and Canada are the most likely to share videos after viewing them. Three quarters (75%) of all mobile viewers in North America share the video. Latin American viewers come in next with more than seven in ten (73%) sharing videos on social media.

Not all viewers share videos on social media with equal frequency. Just over one in five (23%) share videos less than once a month. They are light advocates. Less than half (45%) of mobile viewers share videos on social media sites at least once a month. They are regular advocates.

A third (33%) viewers share videos at least once a week. Among weekly sharers, over one in ten (15%) are heavy advocates. Heavy advocates share at least one video online a day.

Free, fast and quality videos drive social media advocacy

Good picture quality is the top reason motivating viewers to share mobile video. Two in five (40%) viewers share videos that have acceptable video quality. Lack of paywall also influences video sharing. More than a third (38%) of mobile viewers share video if it is free. The third driver of social sharing is streaming speed. A third (33%) of viewers share videos that stream fast. Sound quality, type of connection, and trust also shape viewer decision to share.

Free video and visual quality are top drivers of mobile video advocacy in North America. More than half (51%) of viewers share video if it is free and has good picture quality. Both factors are top advocacy drivers in East Asia as well. More than two in five (45%) viewers share free video content. More than a third (38%) of viewers share online if a video has good picture quality.

Visual quality is the top driver of advocacy in Pacific region, Latin America and Europe. Free content and streaming speed are key factors in the Pacific region and Europe. Latin American viewers value streaming speed and sound quality when it comes to sharing.